How We Know – Epistemology On An Objectivist Foundation

Harry Binswanger’s How We Know – Epistemology On An Objectivist Foundation (TOF Publications) is aimed at exposing the root causes of bad epistemology, and bringing clarity to the crucial questions: What is knowledge? How is it acquired? How is it validated? To a large extent, the material that Binswanger has presented was originated by Ayn Rand.

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A Monetary Policy Primer, Part 6: The Reserve-Deposit Multiplier

The multiplier’s significance to monetary policy is, or used to be, straightforward: it indicated the quantity of additional bank deposits that monetary authorities could expect to see banks produce in response to any increment of new bank reserves supplied them by means of either open-market operations or direct central bank loans.

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The Myth of the Myth of Barter

There is, after all, at least one impulse among humans that’s more deep-seated than their “propensity to truck, barter, and exchange.” I mean, of course, their propensity to let themselves be thoroughly bamboozled.

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Businesses Makes the World a Better Place

Every day, businesses make the world a better place to live, profitably, by creating and trading material values, by mutual consent and for mutual benefit. It’s time we’d recognize it and appreciate business people for what they do. Such a cultural change would, in time, create business heroes also in Hollywood movies and spiritual fuel for all of us.

A Post-Brexit World

The recent vote within the United Kingdom to withdraw from the European Union has implicitly once again raised the issue of the right of self-determination through secession. In other words, do individuals have a right to determine under which political authority they shall live and have representation?

Defending Free Speech for Businesses

An important aspect of the freedom to exercise reason is the freedom of speech: the liberty to express opinions and to persuade others, whether to advertise one’s products, to raise capital, to contract suppliers, or to recruit employees. Taking this freedom away also severely undermines companies’ ability to create material values.

A Monetary Policy Primer, Part 2: The Demand for Money

How can a central bank manage a quantity without being certain just how to define, let alone measure, that quantity? How is it possible for the quantity of money supplied to differ from the quantity demanded? When those things do differ, how can one tell? Finally, just what does “the demand for money” mean?

Left-Wing Fascism in Germany

In Germany, it appears that all you need to do to land in jail is be accused by a judge of having a “clear right-wing background.” Has Germany learned nothing from its prior experiences with fascism?